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environment, we are warriors as opposed to common criminals who should be should be investigated and based on that investigation prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law? many people have made grandiose claims about wanting to be in a war. how that ends up getting decided is based on facts on the ground. it is based on law and facts not on suppositions or on the grandiose claims of people who would like to be bigger than they are. >> host: him ma shamsi with the aclu, american civil libertis. and cliff may, foundation for defense of democracies. he writes a weekly column distributed by scripps howard news service and contributes to nationalreview.online, townhall.com among other publications a lot of folks want to talk to you. let's get back to the lines. charles, wood bridge, virginia, republican, go ahead. >> caller: thanks. you know i am a republican and i am an american obviously and i, my stance is that, i believe -- [inaudible] >> host: charles, we're losing you right as we get. >> caller: i'm sorry. >> host: say it again? >> caller: thank you, i'm sorry. i believe that the admini
some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions one of -- some key questions we wanted to address this point but to the treatment of suspects -- rise to the level of torture quick secondly, if so, how did this happen? and what can we learn from this to make better decisions in the future? on the first question, we found that u.s. personnel in many instances use interrogation techniques on detainees that constitute torture. american personnel conducted an even larger number of interrogations that involve cruel, inhumane or degrading treatment. both categories of actions violate u.s. laws and international treaty obligations. this conclusion is not based upon our own personal impressions, but rather is grounded in a thorough and detailed examination of what constitutes torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees in many instances met the standards, the courts have determined as constituting torture. but in addition you look at the united states state department in its annual count
. this is a report from environment energy news -- talk about the push back. guest: it is interesting that comes from this group. we were talking earlier about the impact -- host: between the majors and the independents? guest: exactly at would be the smaller companies that would feel the brunt of this if the tax code was adjusted. they put all drill that maxwell and there is fewer dollars, there will be less wells that were drilled. another argument they bring up -- we have discussed two tax preferences so far which are intangible drilling costs and percentage to live -- depletion and these are industries specific. they are only available to the oil and gas industry. the argument being made here is that they are similar to other tax preferences that exist in the tax code. that our = availabl to other industries outside of oil and gas. host: are the proposals on capitol hill to just target the major industries as opposed to these independent producers? guest: the president is targeting of the entire industry. certain pieces of legislation, notably from senator robert menendez from new jersey introduc
easy. it is challenging in this fiscal environment. administrations 39 budget -- $39 million budget request. consistent with what congress appropriated in 2013 for the department before sequestration cuts were applied. the level of funding in this budget is lower than what congress appropriated in 2009. stepping back and thinking of the challenges that our country and this department has faced since 2009, times square bombing, hurricane sandy, the ever-changing and growing cyber threat, and of the boston attack, it is easy to become concerned with this budget request. we are facing extremely difficult budgetary times. sacrifices must be made. they may not receive all of the funding. and agencies in government must share in the sacrifice to some extent required during this deficit. our secretary seems to have taken this message to heart. he is identified $1.3 billion in savings this year and more than $4 billion since 2009. he continues to move from a risk-based approach and it effort to save more money. i'm happy to see this budget proposes a much-needed increase for cybersecurity,
work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national zoo, he was so successful turning around a faltering institution that after he left they named a lion in his honor. john indeed was a lion, a lion on behalf of the federal employees, a lion on behalf of good government, a lion on behalf of integrity. john know he is a true leader and manager and an incredibly wa
and the reason is because the environment had so radically changed in a very short period of time. that's one of the things i detail. >> when we look at hawaii now we don't see that. we see the plantations and that sort of thing. so, t.d.? >> what i found out when i was researching this book is the paradise like other things is an intellectual and social construct and just as there is a paper trail in the spanish illusion that gold was to be found in florida, by the way i just want to clarify one thing it begins with the first massacre of white men in the western hemisphere certainly and north america and this is how our history began with a spanish learned there was nothing to be found. it was only tradition in florida, that was before they found out that they had established a settlement in jacksonville so they tore across the atlantic and massacred several hundred frenchmen and that is the beginning of the history. as i say in the beginning if we look at -- for this old guy looking for viagra and largely america thinks here comes a hurricane this is no understanding, but if you look at the
, constructing support mounts for objects, doing additional cleaning in a dry, stable environment. b. altman goal is to put these into the gallery and be able to share as much of the story of how these pumps operated, how they were made, what you're used for, their historical accounts from the sinking. we know that up to last when water put out the oilers, the pumps stopped moving. those are the things to consider is when dupont got here, the valve was still in position at its last moment. the think of the crew of monitor and the things they experienced and the struggles that they undertook to preserve c it ison and how ironi that today 100 petite years later they are still serving the nation in ways they could never have imagined, helping us understand marine conservation, understanding our past, and helping us look forward and learned from the lessons of the past. >> this weekend, looking at the history and literary lights for virginia beach, virginia, including more from the mariners' museum, saturday and noon eastern on c-span2. and sunday at 5:00 on american on c-span3. >> washington journal
environment. the ultimate goal is to put these into the gallery and be able to share is much of the operatedhow the pumps and how they were made. we know that the one in front of us up until almost the last moment was working hard to try to keep the ship from sinking. unfortunately, when the water pushes out the oilers -- ump stoppede p moving. >> i think of the crew of the monitor and the things they experienced and the struggles that they undertook to preserve the union and how ironic is that today, 151 years later, they are still serving the nation but in a very different way and in ways they could never imagine, for helping us understand marine conservation and about our past and helping us move forward and learn from the lessons of the past. to, looking at the history and literary life of virginia beach, virginia, including more from the mariners' museum, saturday and noon eastern on c-span2. and sunday at 5:00 on c-span3. >> "washington journal" continues. texaswe're back with republican louie gohmert, a member of the judiciary committee. thanks for being here. guest: n
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8